History of Camp Tanamakoon

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During school breaks, many children and teenagers go to summer camps to enjoy nature, to learn new things, to develop their skills and talents and to be friends with others.

Some summer camps cater to only one gender such as an all girls’ summer camp. And one of the best all girls’ camps is Camp Tanamakoon.

Camp Tanamaksummercampoon is located in Algonquin Park in Ontario. Its name is based on an old native American word which means “Hail fellow, well met.” This name describes the camp very well since it is in this summer camp that different girls make friendship that lasts.

Camp Tanamakoon was the brainchild by Mary G. Hamilton, whose grandfather was one of the original settlers in 1834. Ms. Hamilton was the principal of Margaret Eaton School in Toronto, Ontario when she founded the summer camp. She was also a pioneer in Physical Education and organized camping in that school.

Miss Hamilton wanted to establish a summer camp for girls so that they could learn the importance of physical education while having fun. She chose the site on the serene shore of a bay in Tanamakoon Lake, later named White’s Lake. Thus, in 1925, Camp Tanamakoon was born. Miss Hamilton was director of the camp until her retirement in 1953.

It is also interesting to note that in its early years, campers from other regions had a hard time coming to Camp Tanamakoon. The girls would arrive by train at the Algonquin Park Station. From here, they would take a canoe and paddle across Lake Tanamakoon to the camp! It became easier for campers to access Camp Tanamakoon when roads were developed.

summerswim Today, the tradition of friendship, fun and learning that was so prevalent in Camp Tanamakoon many years ago is as strong as when it was founded. The camp promotes good values and morals to young girls through a fun-filled summer program. Activities include mountain biking, kayaking, nature tripping, canoe trips, in-camp games, making arts and crafts and many more.

Camp Tanamakoon features comfortable wood cabins, platform tents and obstacle course. The area is also outfitted with advanced safety systems to ensure that the experience will be accident free. The camp is also manned with energetic, responsible, fun loving and outstanding staff who were also former campers.

For more information about Camp Tanamakoon or to arrange a visit with them, one can visit their website on the details.

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One Comment to “History of Camp Tanamakoon”

  • Ammer says:

    The major differences beeewtn a 3 season and a 4 season tent are that the winter rated tents are designed to be able to support or shed a heavy snow load without the frame breaking or the tent collapsing. They also tend to have the rainfly system designed to maintain a more reliable space beeewtn the fly and inner tent wall to minimize condensation and having the fly press on the tent due to a build up of snow. Winter rated tents tend to have smaller window and ventilation areas and will more often have an exterior vestibule arrangement to block wind and to give you a place to leave snowy gear outside the sleeping area or to cook on the ground but out of the wind during storms.Unless you expect heavy snow loads or severe blizzards and extended bivouacs, a good quality (not discount store) 3 season tent can be perfectly adequate for winter camping. I have winter camped many times with 3 season tents, in fact, probably more often than with my 4-season ones (though I own several tents of each type). If your tent pitches tight so that the fly doesn’t blow around and snap in the wind and has strong poles and a vestibule or good fly overhang over the door, you will most likely be fine in it. For winter camping in snow I always carry a microfiber towel to wipe condensation off the inside of the tent walls at night and before I get out of my bag in the morning. Be certain you have stakes that will work in the ground conditions you will encounter. Fat plastic stakes will not work on frozen ground get the thin metal ones that twist in. If you will be camping in deep snowpack, you will want to be able to make dead man anchors by attaching the guy lines and corner staking tabs to buried stuff sacks that you fill with snow or rocks or tying your guy lines to buried branches. You will probably need to stake the tent more solidly than in warmer weather due to the higher potential for wind. Nothing is worse than watching your dome tent bounce down the mountain and out of sight over a cliff (hasn’t happened to me but I’ve seen it happen to others).

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